bg-img3.jpg

Website Pricing Page Tips: How 1 Simple Change 3Xed Sales

Subscribe to Flight Media Blog Notifications

Website Pricing Page Tips: How 1 Simple Change 3Xed Sales

In order to convert leads to customers on a landing page, the user’s path needs to be very clearly defined and laid out.

Pricing pages are, by nature, complex. Especially if you’re offering a subscription service with multiple pricing options.

We know first-hand how complex a pricing page can be; we’ve helped our clients navigate these murky waters.

An elearning/educational testing service provider came to us for help securing leads during their busy season. (We’re not using the name of this client to protect their privacy.) They had a monthly subscription option, as well as an annual payment option.

The pricing page featured a subscription-based service/product. The original pricing page offered these three options:

  1. Product A (billed monthly)
  2. Product A Plus (a more robust product than #1, also billed monthly)
  3. Product A (Billed annually)

We evaluated their pricing page, came up with a strategy for revising the landing page, and got phenomenal results.

Here’s what we found. (You can apply the pricing page tips outlined below to your own page. So ready closely!)

The Pricing Page Evaluation

Upon reviewing the pricing page, we found several problems:

  • It was highly confusing for the user. We weren’t sure what the user was supposed to do on the page. The original page was offering ALL options in the same place without a clear distinction between the products.
  • The page gave users 6 to 7 different options to act on, in addition to the monthly and annual options. This was causing decision paralysis and confusion, which is the last thing you want people to feel when visiting the pricing page. Confused prospects do not buy.
  • There was also no clear distinction around why a user should make the yearly or monthly purchase. The price difference between the two options was not big enough for users to see clear benefits of choosing yearly billing. Since that was unclear, almost everyone went for the monthly billing option. The problem with this scenario is that users who have monthly subscription can cancel their account at any moment, which is exactly what was happening with our client’s monthly customers. Ouch!

The Strategy

We decided to run a test for TWO WEEKS. Here’s what we did:

  • For Product A Plus:

While the client had previously offered this product on the pricing page, we recommended that they do a sales push for “Product A Plus” AFTER the initial subscription purchase – on the back end. The idea was to give users a taste of what the product is like before asking them to invest more in a robust version of the product. During our test, we removed “Product A Plus” from their pricing page.

  • For Product A Monthly and Yearly:  

Here, we recommended going with a “crazy upsell” strategy: Offer a drastic change in price for the monthly product versus the yearly product that the user would be crazy NOT to take advantage of the annual option. More annual sales was one of the ultimate goals, as that would mean an influx of customers who would be customers for 12 months, not just 1 or 2. We decided to push the price of $24.95/month for the monthly plan and $14.95/month on the yearly plan. That is a 40% savings, which would entice lots of cost-conscious buyers.

The Results

Before

Before the test, here’s an overview of the data for:

  • Number of products sold.
  • Revenue generated per product.
  • Percentage of Total Transactions Per Product (or how many transactions were attributed to each product, in percentages).
  • Percentage of Total Sales Per Product (or sales generated per product, in percentages)
  • The conversion rate.

image2-7


Product Description

Number Of Products Sold

Revenue Generated Per Product

% Of Total Transactions Per Product

% Of Total Sales Per Product

Product A Plus Monthly

2

$51.9

14%

12%

Product A Monthly

11

$175.45

79%

42%

Product A Yearly

1

$195.00

7%

46%

Grand Total

14

$422.35

   

During this time period, the pricing page received 1813 unique visits.

That means that the conversion rate was 0.77%.

This is the rate at which visitors were turning into paying customers.

After

After we applied the changes listed above, here’s what happened:

image1-9


Product Description

Number Of Products Sold

Revenue Generated Per Product

% Of Total Transactions Per Product

% Of Total Sales Per Product

Product A Monthly

22

$549.00

85%

49%

Product A Yearly

4

$570.00

15%

51%

Grand Total

26

$1,119.00

   

During this time period, the pricing page received 2646 unique visits.

That means that the conversion rate jumped to 0.98%.

This is the rate at which visitors were turning into paying customers.

Let’s analyze what happened:

  • By removing Product A Plus, we limited the number of options and eliminated decision paralysis.
  • The “crazy upsell” strategy worked. During our test, we sold 4 yearly subscriptions. In two weeks prior to our testing, the client sold only 1.
  • Clear pricing options resulted in an increased conversion rate, which translated to an increase in dollars generated. Prior to our test, the client sold $422.35 worth of products, and during the test $1,119.00 - an increase of 164.94 %. Wow!

Pricing Page Tips

Interested in getting more out of your pricing page? A couple of simple tweaks can have a huge impact on your product sales revenue potential. Removing decision paralysis, offering transparent pricing, and making a clear distinction between product benefits gets results.

Go ahead and try tweaking your product page. Gather the data, test and see how much improvement you’ll see.

Have you made changes to your pricing page that resulted in more revenue?

Keynote Speakers

Blog Comments

Maja Jaredic

Maja is passionate about what she does, and she goes “all in,” whether that means crushing a marketing strategy for a client or helping out a friend. With an MBA in Business Management from the University of Latvia and five years experience in marketing, she holds multiple Hubspot certifications. Maja’s marketing approach is organized and systematic, allowing for lots of creativity and freedom. She speaks four languages, and in her free time, this city girl enjoys traveling, hanging out at the beach, discovering new kinds of beer, and coffee.