Why You Should Watermark Your Images - Flight Media Blog
Why You Should Watermark Your Images

Why You Should Watermark Your Images

In a world of Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and every other worthless social media you don’t use, photos are being shared EVERYWHERE. As soon as you post an image anywhere, it immediately becomes accessible for anyone to download and, also, print. So, how are you protecting your images? The most obvious thing you need to do is copyright. In doing this, you protect the image from anyone stealing your images and using them as their own.

Based on copyright laws, a copyright infringement claim can be made before filing for a copyright on an image. In other words, copyrighting is a lot easier these days because of the data produced when you first create an image and when you upload it to any site. This makes it easier to file for a copyright after the fact because the data will then become proof of originality. Visit the United States Copyright Office for more info.

So what’s up with watermarking? When you watermark your images, you’re doing two things: 1. Preventing somebody from taking your image and using it without crediting you and 2. Advertising yourself on personal Facebook accounts, Twitter account, etc.

When you post an image online, you’re immediately allowing it to be shared. This ISN’T a bad thing! This opportunity can just feed your marketing train and allow more and more people to see your work. If you watermark your images, this will prevent people from downloading the picture and reposting it without giving credit…the credit is already part of the picture.

Too many times have I seen photographers post beautiful images of weddings or seniors without watermarks and the clients do exactly what we talked about: download and repost without credit to you. Some may argue the watermark is “too distracting” or it “ruins the image.” But let me ask you this: Do you prefer more client leads or images without a watermark where there’s a small possibility the client will credit you? Let’s be real…

Main Point

Watermark your images for maximum exposure. As I said before, if your clients do decide to download and repost, your logo will be right there for everyone to see. This will also eliminate the question “who did your pictures?” and send people straight to you.

Get Watermarked

Watermarking can be fairly simple and there’s two different ways it can be done: 1. batch and 2. single. Right now, we’re just going to focus on adding a watermark to a single photo.

1. Open photo in Photoshop

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2. Go to the top menu –> File –> Place

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3. Navigate to your logo/watermark (a white or black version will be best)

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4. The logo will default to the center of the photo. Resize to preference

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(Tip: Hold down “Shift” while changing size of logo/watermark to maintain proportions)

5. Place logo/watermark in a place that doesn’t block important elements

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6. [Option 1] Drop down opacity to 30-40% (based on preference)

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*This method will create a subtle watermark that’s blended into the picture and not too prominent.

7. [Option 2] Right click  the logo layer and select “Blending Options”

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8. Select “Drop Shadow.” Adjust Distance, Spread and Size

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*Drop Distance down to 0, Size and Spread should be adjusted based on your photo. I usually like to keep the Size up higher than the Spread.

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Deciding on which option looks best is all up to you! I personally prefer a more prominent watermark; like the one from Option 2. Play with both options to see which one you would prefer and get the credit you deserve.

All copyright info is based on opinion and is in no way legal advice. Meet with an attorney to be sure you have full understanding and real legal advice….hey, we can’t do it all by ourselves!

Do you watermark in a different way? Comment below with any suggestions or different methods. A community is grown only by it’s members. Pay it forward!

About Isaac Coffy

Photography is my thing. I haven't become a completely established photographer quite yet, however, I do have knowledge that I can't keep for myself!
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